Diagnosis, Technologies & Innovation (Day Seminar, Exeter, 28 January 2013)

One day seminar

Diagnosis, technologies and Innovation

Part of the ESRC Seminar Series: The role of diagnosis in health and wellbeing:  A social science perspective on the social, economic and political costs and consequences of diagnosis

Monday 28 january 2013

9:30 – 4.30pm

Venue: REED HALL

UNIVERSITY OF EXETER

Streatham Campus

Contemporary Western medicine is deeply intertwined with technologies to facilitate its major functions: detecting, diagnosing, treating and preventing disease and disorder. From early technological innovations such as the stethoscope and the scalpel to genetic tests or MRI scans, such technologies embody particular conceptions of what parameters (ought to) define a disease and influence ideas about what sort of remedial technology is appropriate and how disease categories are understood by patients, physicians and the public. Technological innovations are also shifting locations of diagnosis (e.g. e-health initiatives) and blurring distinctions between health and disease through a focus on ‘at risk’ categories. This one day seminar explores contemporary drivers of technological innovation in diagnosis, the impact of new technologies and the challenges they present for governance.

Key Speakers include: Andrew Webster, Sally Wyatt and Katie Featherstone

Registration is free but spaces are limited.

Places will be allocated on a first come-first served basis. To book your place for this event please go to the project website and select the ‘sign-up’ tab.

If you are a postgraduate student or early career researchers you can claim a bursary of up to £75 towards your travel and accommodation costs. Please indicate your status on the website sign-up tab.

 For enquires and additional information please contact Dr Susan Kelly or Dr Michael Morrison.

About Centre for Medical Humanities

Centre for Medical Humanities
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