Greg Atkinson “The human body: a journey round the clock” (Café Scientifique, Stockton, 15 January 2013)

Greg Atkinson: “The human body: a journey round the clock”
Arc
: Dovecot Street Stockton on Tees
Tuesday 15 January at 8pm

Greg will take the audience on a journey through time to see how various functions in the body are affected by body clocks. He will explain why we are at an increased risk of dying from a heart attack in the morning. He will also discuss how time of day can influence our ability to do exercise and exams as well as how the body prepares itself for sleep and awakening. He will also talk about what happens when our body clock is disrupted by shift-work or jet-lag and whether anything can help us alleviate the associated problems.

Greg is Professor in Biological Rhythms and Health Research at Teesside University. His youth was spent in Middlesbrough prior to a sports science degree and research at John Moores University, Liverpool. He is a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and is Editor of the International Journal of Sports Medicine and the International Journal of Cycling Science. He is a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society.Amongst his wide range of research interests are health issues relating to elite soccer, Rock musicians, world class cycling, menopausal hot flush etc

Café Scientifique, Stockton welcomes people of all ages and backgrounds .Our aim is to provide an informal forum in a relaxed café setting to engage in the latest ideas in science and technology. The format is for the invited speaker to give a presentation of about 30 minutes. There follows a short break to refill drinks etc, after which the audience ask questions and share ideas using roving microphones. We meet on the 3rd Tuesday of every month except December and August. The suggested donation to cover expenses is £3 and is collected at the break. Students are welcomed free. Further details may be found here. Please use this address to contact us and receive a monthly e-mail.

About Centre for Medical Humanities

Centre for Medical Humanities
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