Pain, Illness, Trauma and Death in Childhood (CfP, Conference, London, 1 February 2014)

The University of Greenwich, Centre for the Study of Play and Recreation, with the Society for the Study of Childhood in the Past and the London Network for the History of Children present:

Pain, Illness, Trauma and Death in Childhood
1 February 2014
Maritime Greenwich Campus, London SE10 9LS
Call for papers deadline 31 Dec 2013

Pain, illness, trauma and death are intrinsic to the shaping of childhood and to the experience of being a child. In the past, pain could be perceived as beneficial, either in forming character or bringing the subject closer to God. In the present, the enormous popularity of “misery memoirs” raises questions as to why the theme of abuse has such resonance in the twentieth and twenty-first century western world.

Topics include, but are not restricted to:

  • Contributions from history, sociology, anthropology, archaeology, literary studies, psychology, philosophy, geography or health studies
  • Pain, whether physical, emotional, or spiritual, including that inflicted by children
  • Discipline and punishment
  • Analysis of the ways changing patterns of illness shaped the experience of childhood
  • Methodological approaches (such as the history of the emotions) or different sources (such as visual or material culture) for analysing the experiences of children and their carers
  • Children’s experiences of war, including the First World War

Please e-mail abstracts of 250-300 words by 31 December 2013. The conference is free, but registration (via e-mail) is required.

About Centre for Medical Humanities

Centre for Medical Humanities
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